Losing money on AOL after you cancel? It’s a small consolation, but…

AOL is losing money on itself, too. In the last five years its valuation (what people think it might be worth if sold to another entity) has dropped from the $20 billion Google pegged it at in 2005 to a mere $4 billion to $4.3 billion, according to several analysts.

If you cancel AOL but can’t get them to stop billing you, how does this affect you? It doesn’t. It can be hard to fight AOL for your money back, but it can be done. In the meantime, you can comfort yourself with thoughts of karmic retribution visited upon the company by itself, which has seen it’s value sliced, diced and basically diminished to nothing over the years by its own mismanagement.

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Rondy is History

This is Anti-AOL, so I’ll be brutally honest: AOLers aren’t the only ones glad to see Rondy go. Me, too! Years ago I had this sudden flicker of hope for AOL’s future – even if its past was in rags – when Jon Miller took over.

In light of AOL’s “Just cancel the account” fiasco this was what Miller had to say (sort of): “The hell with paid access – let’s become an ad-driven thingy and give away everything – content, software, and email – for free.” He knew AOL’s inability to give people good customer service, timely cancellations, and a decent software suite was entirely intractable, so he chose to move AOL on to greener pastures. I was happy for his arrival and about as excited for him as I could be, considering I’m jaded from years of disliking AOL.

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