The “Commenting on my blog” FAQ.

I think commenting on a WordPress blog is easier and probably more routine for people than figuring out where and how to comment on a LiveJournal, so I’ll keep this short and sweet: name and email. I don’t care if you make the email address up. Or the name! If things ever get out of hand like they did on LJ a few times, which I doubt will happen, I may change how things work. Or I may not. Depends how entertained I am by whatever’s up – sometimes I think the comments, even if they’re getting slightly out of hand, are hilarious. And sometimes, well…I don’t. So, we’ll see…

2 thoughts on “The “Commenting on my blog” FAQ.

  1. SCAM?
    Am AOL and AIM client, had friend blocked from email msg, on12/22 received email from him, i responded, he sent another email, i responded, went back to retrieve and his reponses are no longer in my emails, the email look like i sent to self, am wondering if possible he had access to my account aqnd what happened, i need those reponses and also when i view source comes up as 30353, ga, and my view source is 30361-111 ga, why, is there a connection, he lives in ga and on all previous emails no ip, if spoofing i need to delete accounts, tried to change password on aim and wont let me. if he hacked i want to report and disgusted with aim as no way to report and aol is of no helpm hope u can give some answers what to do, have tried for 3 wks to contact to no avail

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  2. Re: SCAM?
    Hi,
    AOL, as far as I know, does not show zip codes when you view an email’s source. To verify that, here’s the source from an email a spammer sent to me this morning on my AOL account:
    X-AOL-UID: 3384.1647927436
    X-AOL-DATE: Sat, 9 Jan 2010 3:18:59 PM Eastern Standard Time
    Return-Path:
    Received: from rly-md01.mx.aol.com (rly-md01.mail.aol.com [172.20.29.139]) by air-md07.mail.aol.com (v126.13) with ESMTP id MAILINMD071-8e84b48e4a02c9; Sat, 09 Jan 2010 15:18:58 -0500
    Received: from orange.web-ster.com (orange.web-ster.com [65.182.224.41]) by rly-md01.mx.aol.com (v125.7) with ESMTP id MAILRELAYINMD018-8e84b48e4a02c9; Sat, 09 Jan 2010 15:18:40 -0500
    Received: (qmail 32248 invoked from network); 9 Jan 2010 20:18:37 -0000
    Received: from unknown (HELO mail.web-ster.com) (noratallman@web-ster.com@127.0.0.1)
    by orange.web-ster.com with SMTP; Sat, 09 Jan 2010 12:18:37 -0800
    Received: from 41.220.75.3
    (SquirrelMail authenticated user noratallman@web-ster.com)
    by mail.web-ster.com with HTTP;
    Sat, 9 Jan 2010 12:18:37 -0800 (PST)
    Message-ID:
    Date: Sat, 9 Jan 2010 12:18:37 -0800 (PST)
    Subject: Please Acknowledge
    From: “Chang Wantan”
    Reply-To: cwantan@hotmail.com
    User-Agent: SquirrelMail/1.4.15
    MIME-Version: 1.0
    Content-Type: text/plain;charset=iso-8859-1
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
    X-Priority: 3 (Normal)
    Importance: Normal
    X-MagicMail-UUID: 2bb6d874-fd5c-11de-9432-00188b463164
    X-AOL-IP: 65.182.224.41
    X-Mailer: Unknown (No Version)
    Where it says, “Received: from 41.220.75.3” (in bold)? That’s not the spammer’s zip code: that’s his IP address. If you look it up, you might be able to find out where the server he sent the email from is located, and which Internet service provider runs that server. You can also use that information to report a possible account hijacking to AOL.
    Edit: I just did a little more checking online, and the line that you found in the email’s source might look something like this, right:
    “12 Jan, Tue, 10:13:56″,”67.87.226.89″,”Cable/DSL”,”Optimum Online (Cablevision Systems)”,”North America”,”United States”,”New York”,”Yorktown Heights”,”41.2864″,”-73.7908″,”Safari 3″,”Mac OS X”,”1024×768″,”24 Bit (16.7M)”,”JS Enabled”,””,””,””,”http://webmail.aol.com/30361-111/aim-2/en-us/Suite.aspx”
    I’m not sure what it means or why it matters (but if you click the link that got automatically created in that blurb, it takes you right to aol.com’s Webmail, and it’s even indexed by Google as a direct link for it); it looks to me like that’s just telling you which server (and it is located in Georgia, and that is a zip code that you see there) that AOL sent the email from. It might be valuable information for AOL to have if your account was compromised, but it won’t help you much. I guess because I don’t have mail from other AOL users in my AOL/AIM inbox, I would only be able to see it if an AOL user sends me an email (I learn something new every day on this blog, I swear.)
    So just call the number for reporting fraudulent and hijacked AOL accounts that you will always find in my sidebar: 1-800-307-7969, explain the situation to them, read them the source from those suspect emails, and they should know what to do to help you from there.

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